Tag Archives: video

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No Motive

Video from Cheekwood Art and Gardens in Nashville.

Desperate Optimists: Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor
In 1998 seven people from Dublin, Ireland were invited into a studio where they were interviewed and then invited to shoot a gun directly at the camera. No Motive is the resulting video about waiting to shoot a gun and the act itself – an act that is as chilling as it is banal. Each person has to decide how they are going to hold the gun and how they are going to take aim but nobody can anticipate how they are going to respond to the power of a gun once it is fired. No Motive was directed and edited by Desperate Optimists and filmed by Chris Dorley-Brown.

From their first creative engagements twenty years ago with community theatre, and on into experimental performance, complex online projects and now films, Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy (Desperate Optimists) have remained acutely aware of performance and narrative along with the seductive charge inherent in the various languages of cinema.

from Cheekwood Arts and Gardens

Article in the Chattanooga Times Free Press

Great article in the Chattanooga paper about my latest work. In the article it mentions me watching the videos in the chamber, however the videos were played on VCR’s outside the chamber and their magnetic radiation was beamed into the chamber using satellite dishes. Click the image below to download the pdf.

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Burble London

The Burble is a massive structure reaching up towards the sky, composed of approximately 1000 extra-large helium balloons each of which contains microcontrollers and LEDs that create spectacular patterns of light across the surface of the structure. The public, both audience and performer, come together to control this immense rippling, glowing, bustling ‘Burble’ that sways in the evening sky, in response to movements of the long articulated interactive handle bar at the base of the structure. The ephemeral experience exists at such a large scale that it is able to compete visually in an urban context with the buildings that surround it.

The Burble is a massive carbon-fibre structure reaching up towards the sky, composed of approximately 1000 extra-large helium balloons each of which contains microcontrollers and LEDs that create spectacular patterns of light across the surface of the structure.

The Burble is held down to the ground by the combined weight of the crowds holding on to the handle bar. They may position it as they like. They may curve in on themselves, or pull it in a straight line – the form is a combination of the crowd’s desires and the impact of wind currents varying throughout the height of the Burble.

As people on the ground shake and pump the handle bars of the Burble, they see their movements echoed as colours through the entire system. Part installation, part performance, the Burble enables people to contribute at an urban scale to a structure that occupies their city, albeit for only one night.

More info: http://www.haque.co.uk/burblelondon.php

advancedbeauty.org

“Advanced Beauty is an ongoing exploration of digital artworks born and influenced by sound, an ever-growing collaboration between programmers, artists, musicians, animators and architects.

The first collection is a series of audio-reactive ‘video sound sculptures’. Inspired by synasthesia, the rare, sensory experience of seeing sound or tasting colours, these videos are physical manifestations of sound, sculpted by volume, pitch or structure of the soundtrack.

The films embrace unusual video making processes, the visual programming language Processing, high-end audio analysis and fluid dynamic simulations alongside intuitive responses in traditional cell animation. Each artist was given the same set of parameters to work within; to start, finish and exist within a white space, creating a seamless coherence, all sculptures sharing the same white environment.”

Click the image below to watch an HD trailer for the upcoming DVD.

www.advancedbeauty.org

Luke Lamborn

Syracuse Computer Art Grad. From his website:

“This video series documents extraordinary occurrences captured by a passing videographer. The title and direction of the series are a reference to the writings of anthropologist Carlos Castaneda who studied ancient shamanistic methods of experiencing the world paranormally. He described “square millimeters of opportunity” as momentary and radical shifts in perception, during which amazing events are possible. Video compositing and special effects are used to actualize these moments.”